Summer Reading, Earn a FREE Book

One of my favorite Summer Reading Programs is through Barnes and Noble.  The program is for children in grades 1-6 and is a wonderful time to encourage your children to read to earn the reward of a FREE book.

This has been a consistent summer event for my children which they have enjoyed over the years.  Sadly, my oldest will age out this year so although it is bitter-sweet, we are very happy with the selections of books we have been rewarded with throughout the years.

I encourage each of you to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity.  To get started, click here –> Barnes and Noble Summer Reading .

Happy Reading!

Stay connected and checkout our latest accessories for kids –> Cute Beltz

 

Reading Rainbow Enters the Digital Age

I was so excited to hear that LeVar Burton was reviving Reading Rainbow. As a child, I know many who were shaped by this program and how much it helped. Here’s to reading!

Checkout the Kickstarter campaign, https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/readingrainbow/bring-reading-rainbow-back-for-every-child-everywh.

Red Tricycle

Reading Rainbow is making a comeback. This week LeVar Burton launched (and funded in 12 hours!) a Kickstarter campaign to bring brand new stories and videos to kids everywhere, whether they are learning at home or in the classroom. Get ready to take a trip down memory lane as Reading Rainbow begins a whole new chapter in the digital age.

reading-rainbow-levarReading Rainbow For Everyone, Everywhere
In 2012, Reading Rainbow was re-launched as an app that went on to win numerous awards, but Burton knew that not all children had access tablets. So he started the Kickstarter campaign: “Bring Back Reading Rainbow for Every Child, Everywhere” to help Reading Rainbow move beyond the app, onto computer screens and into classrooms. With over $2 million dollars pledged in the first 2 days, Reading Rainbow aims to help tackle illiteracy in children (pssst…did you know that one in every four kids in America…

View original post 240 more words

Choosing the Right Books for Your Child from Birth to Preschool

pg-toddler-bedtime-routines-toddler-reading-full

Studies show that kids with active exposure to language have social and educational advantages over their peers, and reading is one of the best exposures to language.  Reading with children at an early age sets the foundation for later independent reading.  But how do you know which books are the right ones to bring into your home or to check out of the library? This guide offers tips and strategies to help you and your child learn how to choose good books together.

Infants: Birth to 6 Months

  • Content. Choose books with large pictures or bright and bold illustrations set against a contrasting background. Look for books that have simple pictures, one per page.
  • Language. Infants will enjoy looking through wordless picture books, or books that have just a single word along with a big picture. But also try books that contain phrases or short sentences. It’s important for infants to hear language. Nursery rhymes and verse books are good for this age, too.
  • Design. Books for infants should be interesting and appealing to look at. Try stiff cardboard books, books with fold-out pages that create colorful panels, cloth or soft vinyl books, and books with handles.
  • Reading Aloud. Infants want your full attention, so try reciting rhymes and songs that you remember by heart. Also, try reading to your infant while she has a toy to hold. Reading at bedtime is always a nice way to end the day!

Infants: 7 to 12 Months

  • Content. Children this age will enjoy books with medium to large photos and bright, bold illustrations. Look for books that have simple drawings of familiar things, actions and events.
  • Language. Children begin to key into content and can relate pictures to their world. While they still enjoy picture books, try some books with simple stories that have one line of text per page.
  • Design. Infants this age like to handle cloth and vinyl books and cardboard books with stiff, thick pages.
  • Reading Aloud. As your baby gets older, try this four-part interaction sequence: 1) Get your baby’s attention by pointing out something in a book. (“Look!”). 2) Ask a labeling question. (“What’s that?”). 3) Wait for your baby to respond, verbally or non-verbally. If necessary, provide the answer yourself. (“That’s a monkey!”). 4) Acknowledge your baby’s response. (“Yes”) or repeat your baby’s word.) If your baby mislabels the picture, correct him in a positive manner. (“Yes, it’s brown like a dog, but it’s a monkey.”). Keep in mind that you may not get through a whole book in one reading. As your child starts to explore books, support her progress by watching, listening and acknowledging.

Infants: 12 to 18 months

  • Content. For children this age, try books with pictures of familiar characters, like animals, children, TV characters or adults in familiar roles. Look for books that have action pictures – your baby is starting to be able to enjoy pictures with more details.
  • Language. This is a great age to try books with songs and repetitive verses. Books that have a simple story line that relates to your child’s own experiences will also have appeal. You might also look for theme books that show a series of related pictures and a few words. These books follow a progression of simple activities, but don’t try to introduce a plot or complex storyline.
  • Design. Even though your baby is growing fast, she’ll still enjoy playing with books with handles and books with stiff, thick pages. And she’ll still like having these books read to her. Books with thinner pages that are plastic-coated are also a good choice for this age.
  • Reading Aloud. Your infant will probably still enjoy reading with you as he sits on your lap or close to you in a comfortable chair. This helps your baby associate reading with feeling secure. Connecting sounds with the pictures he sees in the books will make reading together even more fun. Make your own sounds, and don’t be surprised if your baby joins in! You may also notice your child looking through the book alone and making noises (sometimes called “book babble”).

Toddlers: 19 to 30 Months

  • Content. Toddlers will continue to enjoy books with familiar characters, but they also will begin to take interest in pictures filled with information, action and detail. Try some short stories, cause and effect stories, and fictional books that describe a problem or circumstance to overcome.
  • Language. Try predictable books with repeated text, words that rhyme, and pictures that correspond to the text. Books with songs and repetitive verses are still a good choice for this age.
  • Design. Toddlers can enjoy books with paper pages-but will still like books with a picture on every page and just a little bit of text.
  • Reading Aloud. Let your toddler decide if she wants to sit on your lap while you read, or next to you on the couch or floor. Follow her cues. Talk about the characters and events in the story, relating them to your child’s own experiences. Pause when you read aloud to let your child fill in a word or phrase. This works great with rhyming and repetitive books.

For preschoolers

Choose Stories about things or activities that are familiar to them (a trip to the zoo, a birthday party, etc.)

  • Picture vocabulary books and alphabet books – they love to learn new words and recite their letters.
  • Books about animals and adventures.
  • Funny books with riddles or jokes.
  • Books with rhymes and repetition which they will often memorize and recite along with you.
  • Simple factual books, particularly for those children who have very specific interests like trucks, trains, dinosaurs, fire engines or fish.
Cute Beltz - Belts for Kids

Toddler Belts & Kids Belts

Easter Basket Gift Ideas | Cute Beltz

DSC_0477With Easter just a few days away why not add something more than candy to your kid’s basket.  Check out some of your ideas for making your child’s Easter basket fun, creative, and unique.

Gift Baskets for Toddlers

Toddlers are just beginning to learn about Easter and what it means to receive an Easter basket. Keep it simple with brightly colored plastic eggs. In the case of toddlers, you don’t need to fill the eggs with anything because anything small enough to fit in an egg can be considered a choking hazard. In addition to plastic eggs, you can include Easter themed soft books, building blocks and stuffed animals.

Gift Baskets for Preschoolers

When filling an Easter basket for a preschooler, first, think about what kind of container you’d like to use. Certainly a traditional basket works well, but there are lots of other treat holders you can use. Consider filling up something that your little one can play with or put to use later like:

  • beach pail
  • big pocketbook
  • play grocery cart
  • Coloring books
  • jewelry box
  • puzzles
  • bubbles
  • chalk
  • bicycle helmet

Preschoolers and Elementary Kids

If your little one is head over heels for craft projects and coloring an excellent idea is to arts and crafts themed Easter Basket full of special goodies. Crayons and coloring books are a must. Include items such as markers, finger paint and/or paint and paintbrushes. You can’t forget the construction paper in a variety of wonderful colors.

All Ages

From infant to teenager, books are perfect Easter-basket filler.  This may be a clichéd but the truth is that books are one of the best gifts that you can ever give to children on any occasion. Books help to develop a habit of reading in children that they can pick up as a hobby. Reading helps to expand the mind and creates a sense of curiosity and thirst to find out more. For toddlers you may want to choose cloth books or board books with thick pages and bright colorful pictures. Preschool and early elementary students enjoy books about animals, other children or their favorite television characters. For older children and teens, pick the newest book in a series they enjoy or a subscription to a favorite magazine.

 

Cute Beltz - Belts for Kids

Toddler Belts & Kids Belts

Read a Book Day!

I love that there is a day acknowledging reading!!!  I taught my girls early the importance of reading and now at the ages of 5 & 7 they are avid readers.  We go to the library every week and load up on books which I find is the best way to keep them interested and the most affordable.  Tonight I think we will read, “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” by Dr. Seuss, one of our favorites.  What’s your child’s favorite book?

Here’s to reading!  –Cute Beltz

Cute Beltz - Belts for Kids

Toddler Belts & Kids Belts